cinemamonamour:

The difference between surprise and suspense explained by Alfred Hitchcock:

“Here we are, back in our old situation: surprise or suspense. And we come to our old analogy of the bomb: you and I sit talking and there’s a bomb in the room. We’re having a very innocuous conversation about nothing. Boring. Doesn’t mean a thing. Suddenly, boom! the bomb goes off and they’re shocked–for fifteen seconds. Now you change it. Play the same scene, insert the bomb, show that the bomb is placed there, establish that it’s going to go off at one o’clock–it’s now a quarter of one, ten of one–show a clock on the wall, back to the same scene. Now our conversation becomes very vital, by its sheer nonsense. “Look under the table! You fool!” Now they’re working for ten minutes, instead of being surprised for fifteen seconds”.[x]

cinemamonamour:

The difference between surprise and suspense explained by Alfred Hitchcock:

“Here we are, back in our old situation: surprise or suspense. And we come to our old analogy of the bomb: you and I sit talking and there’s a bomb in the room. We’re having a very innocuous conversation about nothing. Boring. Doesn’t mean a thing. Suddenly, boom! the bomb goes off and they’re shocked–for fifteen seconds. Now you change it. Play the same scene, insert the bomb, show that the bomb is placed there, establish that it’s going to go off at one o’clock–it’s now a quarter of one, ten of one–show a clock on the wall, back to the same scene. Now our conversation becomes very vital, by its sheer nonsense. “Look under the table! You fool!” Now they’re working for ten minutes, instead of being surprised for fifteen seconds”.[x]


The house is interesting, it never existed. There were pieces of the house built and there’s a shot where we were walking. You see the house in the background and that’s a traveling matte shot. That was a paint of the house and we were on a treadmill. And the house is going back and we’re standing still. - Martin Landau

The house is interesting, it never existed. There were pieces of the house built and there’s a shot where we were walking. You see the house in the background and that’s a traveling matte shot. That was a paint of the house and we were on a treadmill. And the house is going back and we’re standing still. - Martin Landau

Well, I’m not too pleased with the way Suspicion ends. I had something else in mind. The scene I wanted, but it was never shot, was for Cary Grant to bring her a glass of milk that’s been poisoned and Joan Fontaine has just finished a letter to her mother: “Dear Mother, I’m desperately in love with him, but I don’t want to live because he’s a killer. Though I’d rather die, I think society should be protected from him.” Then, Cary Grant comes in with the fatal glass and she says, “Will you mail this letter to Mother for me, dear?” She drinks the milk and dies. Fade out and fade in on one short shot: Cary Grant, whistling cheerfully, walks over to the mailbox and pops the letter in. - Alfred Hitchcock

vintagesonia:

Alfred Hitchcock greets Grace Kelly, C.1950’s

vintagesonia:

Alfred Hitchcock greets Grace Kelly, C.1950’s