Glenn Ford photographed for Destroyer, 1943.

forlovelyritahayworth:

 Glenn and son Peter Ford visit Rita Hayworth on the set of The Lady From Shanghai, c. 1947.

forlovelyritahayworth:

Glenn and son Peter Ford visit Rita Hayworth on the set of The Lady From Shanghai, c. 1947.


“Pete and Glenn and I are all note-happy,” says Ellie. “We’ve been sending notes back and forth to each other for years. If I have to go out and speak at different churches, during a period when Glenn’s working on a picture, he’s in bed when I get home.  But I’ll find notes from him in little out of the way places around the room.  He’ll be mad at me for telling you this —-” —Glenn Ford and Eleanor Powell, in Photoplay, 1956

“Pete and Glenn and I are all note-happy,” says Ellie. “We’ve been sending notes back and forth to each other for years. If I have to go out and speak at different churches, during a period when Glenn’s working on a picture, he’s in bed when I get home.  But I’ll find notes from him in little out of the way places around the room.  He’ll be mad at me for telling you this —-” —Glenn Ford and Eleanor Powell, in Photoplay, 1956

mrglennford:

Happy Birthday to the Fastest Gun Alive Glenn Ford!! | May 1, 1916 - August 30, 2006 

When I see films that go on and on with dialogue, I feel like telling the actors, “Be quiet! Let the audience do some of the work!” - Glenn Ford
Glenn Ford feeding pigeons in Trafalgar Square in London, England, 1951.
Glenn Ford feeding pigeons in Trafalgar Square in London, England, 1951.

Rita and I were very fond of one another.  We became very close friends and I guess it all came out on the screen. —Glenn Ford

Rita and I were very fond of one another.  We became very close friends and I guess it all came out on the screen. —Glenn Ford

stanwycked:

Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford on the set of Gilda, 1946

stanwycked:

Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford on the set of Gilda, 1946

Censorship was still in force in Hollywood in the early 1950s, and violence was monitored just as sternly as sexuality.  The Big Heat’s script contained a number of unusually violent and code-challenging scenes, including the opening suicide, brutal murders, and a sadistic disfigurement or two.  There was a lot of concern over how much of this would have to be cut or toned down, but Fritz Lang was adamant that the scenes of violence and cruelty stay as written — they were his favorite parts of the script.  He would find a way, he said, to shoot it all but in a style that would get everything past he censors.

Rita and I were very fond of one another.  We became very close friends and I guess it all came out on the screen. —Glenn Ford

Rita and I were very fond of one another.  We became very close friends and I guess it all came out on the screen. —Glenn Ford